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Rabbitude

September 15, 2019

Bunnies are very adorable little pets. However, they aren’t quite as innocent as they look. In fact, Floppy has a bit of an attitude! A Spring Valley, CA vet discusses rabbitude below.

Stubbornness

Rabbits are notoriously stubborn. Floppy may decide that a certain spot is going to be her bathroom. Or, she may insist on getting behind the sofa, no matter how many times you retrieve her. In some cases, it’s best to work with your pet, rather than against her. For instance, you may have better luck putting a litterbox in your furry pal’s chosen spot than getting her to move.

Pet Peeves

Bunnies definitely have some pet peeves. For one thing, they can be very territorial about their cages. Some rabbits get very upset if their humans rearrange things! Your pet may also get irritated with you if her dinner is late, if she doesn’t get enough free time, or if you ignore her requests for cuddles or playtime. Bunnies also don’t like loud noises, and they aren’t particularly fond of car rides.

Angry Bunny

How do you tell if your bunny is angry? If your pet is grunting or growling, there’s a pretty good chance that you have a cranky furball on your hands. Irritated rabbits sometimes wag their tails or thump their legs. Floppy may also stand on her back legs and ‘punch,’ or just turn her back on you and ignore you.

Rage Vs. Illness

Make sure you know the difference between signs of bunny rage and indications of pain. If Floppy is grinding her teeth, screaming, or acting stiff, listless, or lethargic, she may be sick or in pain. Contact your vet immediately if you notice these red flags.

Tips

It’s important to understand that bunnies take things very personally. They also can overreact a bit. Never hit or yell at Floppy, even if she did chew your favorite book. Discipline really doesn’t work with bunnies, and often just scares them. If you catch Floppy doing something wrong, squirt her with water, rattle a jar of change, thump your foot (not too hard), or talk to her in a stern, disapproving tone. The key is to slowly teach your furball to associate the unwanted behavior with unwanted results.

Please contact us, your local Spring Valley, CA vet clinic, with any questions or concerns about your pet’s health or care. We’re here to help!


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